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November 25, 2018

‘The Lion King’ Teaser Broke a Record for Disney

If you watched Disney’s teaser for “The Lion King” on Thursday, you’re far from alone. The 93-second preview was viewed 224.6 million times within its first 24 hours, setting a new record for the Mouse House — even as it sparked a debate over whether such a CGI-heavy endeavor truly qualifies as “live action.”

The record comes with a caveat, as the teaser for “Avengers: Infinity War” — which, as a Marvel Studios production, also fell under the Disney umbrella — racked up 238 million views in its first day. The new look at Jon Favreau’s update of the 1994 animated classic is familiar to anyone who’s seen the original, as it shows Simba (voiced by Donald Glover) being presented to his future kingdom as Mufasa (James Earl Jones) once again informs him that “everything the light touches is our kingdom.”

The voice cast also includes Beyoncé as Nala, Chiwetel Ejiofor as Scar, Alfre Woodard as Simba’s mother Sarabi, John Oliver as Zazu, John Kani as Rafiki, Florence Kasumba as Shenzi, Eric André as Azizi, and Billy Eichner and Seth Rogen as Timon and Pumbaa, respectively.

Favreau also directed 2016’s live-action update of “The Jungle Book,” one of many flesh-and-blood remakes Disney has produced in recent years. Others include “Cinderella,” “Beauty and the Beast,” and the upcoming “Dumbo” and “Aladdin.”

“The Lion King” will be released on July 19, 2019.

Source: IndieWire film

November 25, 2018

Ricky Jay, Master Magician and ‘Boogie Nights’ Actor, Dies at 72

Ricky Jay, a singularly skilled magician whose acting career included roles in “Deadwood” and “Boogie Nights,” died in Los Angeles yesterday. He was 72. The news was confirmed by Jay’s manager, Winston Simone, who said that he died of natural causes and “was one of a kind. We will never see the likes of him again.”

“I am sorry to share that my remarkable friend, teacher, collaborator and co-conspirator is gone,” tweeted Michael Weber, Jay’s partner in the Deceptive Practices Company.

Jay was the subject of a 2012 documentary, “Deceptive Practice: The Mysteries and Mentors of Ricky Jay,” directed by Molly Bernstein. It explored his revered career as a magician, as did a 1993 New Yorker profile that referred to Jay as “perhaps the most gifted sleight of hand artist alive.” Those talents also brought him work as a behind-the-scenes consultant on movies like “The Prestige,” “The Illusionist,” and “Ocean’s Thirteen.”

“Boogie Nights” wasn’t Jay’s only collaboration with Paul Thomas Anderson, as he also had a role in “Magnolia”; his most frequent collaborator was David Mamet, however, as he appeared in “House of Games,” “The Spanish Prisoner,” “State and Main,” “Redbelt,” and “Things Change.”

Born Richard Jay Potash on June 26, 1946 in Brooklyn, Jay was the first and only magician profiled on PBS’ “American Masters.” He also wrote and lectured on magic extensively throughout his life, touring colleges and authoring several books. His final onscreen appearance was in 2015’s “The Automatic Hate.”

Tributes have been pouring in:

Source: IndieWire film

November 23, 2018

How to start your business story with a bang – Part 2

Source: Visual Storytelling

November 21, 2018

How to start your business story with a bang – Part 1

Source: Visual Storytelling

November 21, 2018

2018 SXSW Film Festival Selections: Animated Shorts [Video]

To give you a taste of what’s to come at SXSW 2019, we’re remembering the incredible work we showcased at the 2018 SXSW Film Festival that is available to watch online now!

This week we’re highlighting the 2018 Animated Shorts Competition. We’re always on the look out for films that use imaginative animation styles and stories to create an eclectic and fun screening for our audience.

The winner of our SXSW Animated Shorts Competition each year is Oscar Qualified and becomes eligible for the Academy Awards. If you’re curious about SXSW Shorts Programming check out this podcast for insight into our process.

If you’re interested in what types of films we program, you can also check out short films from past editions of SXSW on our SXSW Film Festival Vimeo Channel!

2018 SXSW Animated Short Film Selections

JEOM directed by Kangmin Kim

A father and a son both have the same big birthmark on their butt. Believing that the two birthmarks are connected, the son scrubs his father’s birthmark to remove it – but he just can’t get rid of it.

Octane directed by Jeron Braxton

A street race that reflects America’s genocidal history and the parallels between slavery and the private prison system.

Solar Walk directed by Réka Bucsi

Solar Walk shows the a cosmic journey of individuals and their passion for creation, through the unique and playful texture of the animation craft itself.

Undiscovered directed by Sara Litzenberger

Sasquatch has always remained elusive in photos – but not for the reasons we think.

Other Animated Shorts that were part of the SXSW 2018 program, but are not yet available to watch on online include:

  • Abnie Oberfork: A Tale of Self-Preservation directed by Shannon Fleming

  • Agua Viva directed by Alexa Lim Haas

  • Intimity directed by Elodie Dermange

  • Manivald directed by Chintis Lundgren

  • People of Color directed by Raghav Arumugam

  • Sog directed by Jonatan Schwenk

  • The Shivering Truth directed by Vernon Chatman, Cat Solen

Join Us For SXSW 2019

Register and book your hotel now to save! The Film Badge gets you primary access to all SXSW Film events including Film Keynotes and Featured Sessions, world premieres, round tables, workshops, parties, and more. Over the course of nine days, the SXSW Film Festival hosts over 450 screenings! Film registrants also have primary access to Convergence events, including the Comedy Festival and nine unique Conference tracks, as well as secondary access to most Interactive and Music events.

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and SXSW News for the latest SXSW coverage.

See you in March!

Agua Viva – Photo by Alexa Lim Haas

The post 2018 SXSW Film Festival Selections: Animated Shorts [Video] appeared first on SXSW.

Source: SxSW Film

November 20, 2018

Annie J. Howell and Lisa Robinson – SXSW Film Festival Alumni Stories

At SXSW 2018 we celebrated the 25th Edition of the SXSW Film Festival and had the pleasure of sharing stories, memories, and reflections from our distinguished alumni. We had a blast telling these tales and want to keep the party going! Today we spotlight Annie J. Howell and Lisa Robinson.

Howell and Robinson have co-directed, co-produced, and co-written two feature films together that have world premiered at SXSW. Small, Beautifully Moving Parts (2011) and Claire in Motion (2016), both of which premiered in the Narrative Feature Competition. Recently, Howell wrote episodes for the TV series A Crime to Remember and Robinson directed episodes for the series as well, which aired on Investigation Discovery. Additionally, Howell directed the short Dolly at SXSW 2001 and co-directed the short Futurestates which world premiered at SXSW 2010. Read their stories below!

Annie J. Howell

“I am so proud to call SX my festival home. Janet [Pierson] and her amazing team of programmers create something so wildly precious – a gorgeous elixir of the far-flung, the out, the in, the loud, the quiet, and the sublime. I showed a few shorts in the 2000s, a warm up act for the honor of being part of the competition line-up with our first feature, Small, Beautifully Moving Parts. Little did we know that we had the queen of SX in our movie, Anna Margaret Hollyman – who also graced the bumpers that year in one of the very best, Joe Nicolosi‘s The Line – which, watching now, makes me want to spend my own life in line at SX! Having the lights go down on our movie’s premiere at The Paramount, electricity in the air – ranks up there as one of the most exciting moments I’ve had, ever.”

Lisa Robinson

“It has been so exciting to premiere two features at SXSW. When I think of this festival I think of the energy. SXSW is the opposite of static…everything, everyone, the films, the music is all just bustling and it has such kinetic possibility making it a fantastic launch pad for work. For our recent film Claire In Motion we had so many members of our amazing crew and cast attend, including Betsy Brandt and SX frequenter Anna Margaret Hollyman. We had last seen each other in a quiet town in Ohio on sleepy streets and dusty hills and there we were in Austin…celebrating the premiere in this electric firecracker – like atmosphere. So besides all the amazing films and people…this is what I like about SXSW. Thanks Janet and team!”

Join Us For SXSW 2019

Register and book your hotel now to save! The Film Badge gets you primary access to all SXSW Film events including Film Keynotes and Featured Sessions, world premieres, round tables, workshops, parties, and more. Over the course of nine days, the SXSW Film Festival hosts over 450 screenings! Film registrants also have primary access to Convergence events, including the Comedy Festival and nine unique conference tracks, as well as secondary access to most Interactive and Music events.

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and SXSW News for the latest SXSW coverage.

See you in March!

Annie J. Howell (L) and Lisa Robinson attend the premiere of Claire in Motion – Photo by Diego Donamaria/Getty Images for SXSW

The post Annie J. Howell and Lisa Robinson – SXSW Film Festival Alumni Stories appeared first on SXSW.

Source: SxSW Film

November 19, 2018

Laura Dunn, Luke Meyer & Andrew Neel – SXSW Film Festival Alumni Stories

At SXSW 2018 we celebrated the 25th Edition of the SXSW Film Festival and had the pleasure of sharing stories, memories, and reflections from our distinguished alumni. We had a blast telling these tales and want to keep the party going! Today we spotlight Laura Dunn, Luke Meyer, and Andrew Neel.

Laura Dunn

From the years 1999–2016, Dunn brought four films to SXSW, starting with the short Pretty as a Picture (co-directed with Diane Zander). Her next films were all documentary features, Green (2001), The Unforeseen (2007), and Look & See: A Portrait of Wendell Berry (world premiered in 2016 as The Seer). The film won a Special Jury Recognition for Cinematography and recently aired on PBS earlier this year.

“Going to SXSW is like going home. You’ve journeyed afar, gotten lost and painfully found your way back to the place where you began. But now, you see it all so differently. When you left, like a kid going off to college, you imagined you were meant for bigger things. And when you return, humbled, happy to be home, liberated from yourself in a wonderful way, you realize this place is who you are. One of my favorite moments in my film trajectory happened at SXSW when my husband Jef and I went to the stage (most unexpectedly) to receive a Jury Prize. I had our sixth son, only a few months old, strapped to me in a carrier. I felt self-conscious, worried that I might lose my footing, stumble on words, but no one judged. In fact, several women directors later thanked me for making that duality of filmmaking/motherhood OK. That’s Austin for you and SXSW — an open field of resources where you can be who you need to be.”

Luke Meyer and Andrew Neel

Meyer and Neel have world premiered three films at SXSW. Their directorial feature debut Darkon won the Audience Award for Documentary Feature Competition, and in 2016, the festival re-screened the film as a Special Event to celebrate the 10th anniversary. At SXSW 2009 the pair premiered their documentary about conspiracy theory titled New World Order, and in 2012, the festival world premiered the narrative feature King Kelly, with Neel as the director and Meyer as a producer.

Darkon was the first feature for many of us who worked on it, and with that came a certain amount of anxiety before our premiere. I don’t think any of us will ever forgot what it was like – hours before the first screening – to see a team of fully-armored Darkonians in hard core foam-padded combat on the streets of Austin, and have Darkon’s fantasy world from the film merge with the festival.”

Join Us For SXSW 2019

Register and book your hotel now to save! The Film Badge gets you primary access to all SXSW Film events including Film Keynotes and Featured Sessions, world premieres, round tables, workshops, parties, and more. Over the course of nine days, the SXSW Film Festival hosts over 450 screenings! Film registrants also have primary access to Convergence events, including the Comedy Festival and nine unique conference tracks, as well as secondary access to most Interactive and Music events.

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and SXSW News for the latest SXSW coverage.

See you in March!

The post Laura Dunn, Luke Meyer & Andrew Neel – SXSW Film Festival Alumni Stories appeared first on SXSW.

Source: SxSW Film

November 18, 2018

Add clips to Premiere Pro sequences

Add a clip to a sequence<p>You can add clips to a sequence in the following ways:<p>An <i>overwrite edit</i> adds a clip by replacing any frames already in a …
Source: CW’s Flipboard Feed

November 18, 2018

Governors Awards Red Carpet Scaled Back by Academy Due to Wildfires

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is choosing to “scale back” the red carpet at tonight’s Governors Awards due to the ongoing wildfires in California, which have led to at least 76 deaths. 1,200 people are listed as missing in the town of Paradise, and the conflagration is still only 55 percent contained.

“In light of the tragic wildfires burning through California, we have decided to scale back our red carpet at the Governors Awards this year, making it exclusively photos only,” an AMPAS spokesperson said in a statement. “The dinner and ceremony will continue in order to honor the achievements of these artists and filmmakers that are so deserving.”

Several red carpets were canceled at AFI FEST for the same reason, including the world premieres of “Bird Box” and “Mary Queen of Scots,” which closed the weeklong festival. Screenings of “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs,” “Destroyer,” and “Widows” likewise began without the usual fanfare.

Publicist Marvin Levy, composer Lalo Schifrin, and actress Cicely Tyson are all being presented with Honorary Oscars tonight, while Kathleen Kennedy and Frank Marshall will receive the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award; the latter honor is reserved for creative producers “whose body of work reflects a consistently high quality of motion picture production.” Kennedy and Marshall are married, and they’re the first married couple to take home the prize together.

The ceremony takes place at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland Center.

Source: IndieWire film

November 18, 2018

‘Green Book’: Will Word of Mouth Save the Wobbly Oscar Contender?

Two high-level openings with Oscar hopes, Peter Farrelly’s “Green Book” (Universal) and Julian Schnabel’s “At Eternity’s Gate” (CBS), dominate the new releases entering the crowded and volatile specialized award season marketplace. “Green Book” is struggling to pull audiences with a multi-city opening at top theaters. The true 60s story starring Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali will need a dramatic word-of-mouth boost it before its planned quick expansion. Schnabel’s Vincent Van Gogh biopic launched well with its iconic subject promising strong positive specialized response ahead.

Lucas Hedges'Boy Erased' film premiere, Arrivals, Los Angeles, USA - 29 Oct 2018

Lucas Hedges

AFF-USA/REX/Shutterstock

Boy Erased” (Focus) led the new expansions –among the best of wider releases this fall. The market has suddenly become very competitive, with a number of films struggling and risking not getting full holiday bookings as the lucrative Thanksgiving weekend approaches.

Opening

Green Book (Universal) – Metacritic: 70; Festivals include: Toronto, Mill Valley, Hamptons 2018

$313,000 in 25 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $12,520

Few of this year’s late releases have had the wind at their backs like Peter Farrelly’s 1960s Deep South interracial road trip saga. After winning the coveted People’s Choice Award at Toronto, it pushed to the front of the pack of Oscar contenders, and was given the sort of marketing push one sees more often from specialized companies than studios. (It was once set for Focus Features release.)

But all contenders, especially the most serious, need to get through the crucible of their opening weekend and how the public responds (a tricky process that Netflix is struggling with as the soon-to-be stream “Roma” opens on Wednesday). And based on the initial results, “Green Book” is falling short so far.

In a move familiar to canny Oscar campaigners Fox Searchlight and Weinstein, Universal opened “Green Book” at 25 theaters in 17 markets. The resulting per theater average from is $12,520; the four core New York/Los Angeles theaters will average a more robust $25,000.

This is by no means a disaster, but any comparison with films this season released in the same or similar four top theaters in New York and Los Angeles show how far it falls below its potential. Since Labor Day, “Free Solo,” “Boy Erased,” “Beautiful Boy,” “Mid90s,” “Colette,” “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” and “Wildlife” opened better — often much better — on their initial weekends. (“Suspiria” in two theaters almost doubled the approximate $100,000 it will take in.)

Universal’s attempt to broaden the initial dates was designed to spark strong word of mouth ahead of the planned 1,000 theater expansion this Wednesday. So they booked the movie in 15 other general audience theaters, including some with significant African-American patronage. Opening a movie with more than just the usual two cities is not uncommon. Fox Searchlight, Weinstein and others have shown success with this approach, particularly when trying to reach out to African-American audiences.

The $12,520 PTA for the 25 theaters shows itself to be weak in this context. It is behind Fox’s current success “The Hate U Give,” which managed $2,000 more in nine additional theaters (which makes its result more impressive, as PTAs go down usually with additional screens). It is lower than two Fox Searchlight films that were box-office disappointments, “Battle of the Sexes” anf “Hitchcock.” “12 Years a Slave” in 19 theaters managed around $50,000 on its way to a Best Picture win and around $60 million total.

In the theaters outside of the top two cities in some of the most commercial theaters, “Green Book” did not perform well. But it was the top gross at the Landmark in Los Angeles, and second or third best on four more screens. But then it was only fourth best at five, fifth at seven, sixth at two, seventh at four, and a lowly eighth and ninth at two more.

These are not encouraging results for a film with such high prospects. Universal in its summary of the figures describes them as “great,” but was unavailable when asked for further comment. They do report that these initial theaters gave the film an early A+ Cinemascore. And in that response is their best hope, as well as a sign of the logic to this plan. They clearly hope that word of mouth will overcome what is clearly initial resistance to the film’s marketing materials compared to what its pre-release bonafides have been.

Its Saturday grosses were up 40 percent from Friday, a respectable but not spectacular increase for this kind of adult appeal film (“12 Years a Slave” with much higher numbers was up about the same). Universal has to be scrutinizing its intended expansion to 1,000 theaters this Wednesday. The film could use a slower release build in order to maximize word of mouth.

What comes next: Near-term early awards boosts could help, but this next week is going to be critical for how this fares. So far, it looks like a challenge.

“At Eternity’s Gate”

CBS Films

At Eternity’s Gate (CBS) – Metacritic: 78; Festivals include: Venice, New York 2018

$92,000 in 4 theaters; PTA: $23,000

Vincent Van Gogh has been a draw in films in recent years. This latest effort, the fifth feature from painter Julian Schnabel, stars Willem Dafoe and enjoyed a decent if not spectacular start at four prime New York/Los Angeles theaters during a competitive time frame. The total from four theaters is slightly less than the much higher profile “Green Book.”

For all their high-end cultural appeal, Schnabel has not been a box-office darling. His biggest performer, “The Diving Bell and the Butterfly,” opened marginally bigger (in adjusted terms), and these opening numbers are ahead of his earlier “Before Night Falls.”

What comes next: 12 additional cities start the film’s expansion this Wednesday.

Shoah: Four Sisters (Cohen) – Metacritic: 96

$2,426 in 1 theater; PTA: $2,426; Cumulative: $3,225

The last film from Claude Lanzmann, director of the monumental  “Shoah,” is four and a half hours of additional interviews from the period when he made the original films. The initial reviews are in the same range. The initial targeted engagement opened in New York to only minor initial response.

What comes next: Los Angeles opens Wednesday. Expect this to have a presence for an extended time through various media, relying on Lanzmann’s enormous reputation and the impact of his masterpiece.

Hugh Jackman stars in Columbia Pictures' THE FRONT RUNNER.

“The Front Runner”

Courtesy of Sony Pictures

Week Two

The Front Runner (Sony)

$72,000 in 22 theaters +18); PTA: $3,273; Cumulative: $163,000

Jason Reitman’s telling of the downfall of Gary Hart, which was looking for a possible first Oscar nomination for Hugh Jackman, continued its weak run after its mediocre limited start last week. Though Sony will continue with its expansion, this shows no signs of finding any sort of significant response ahead.

The Ballad of Buster Scruggs (Netflix); also streaming

$(unknown) in est. 8 theaters (+ est. 5); PTA: $(unknown); Cumulative: $(unknown)

After its initial odd four-day runs at three theaters, the Coen Brothers’ latest film, which debuted on Netflix on Friday, added at least five more theaters while returning to the original three. Where seating information is available, it played mainly on small screens, with some sellouts indicated. The point for Netflix isn’t the gross — getting film critic reviews the same as other movies is key for them, as well as establishing the point that for certain releases there will be theaters. The (unreported) results when “Roma” opens this Wednesday in limited initial dates will be closely scrutinized.

El Angel (The Orchard)

$20,848 in 11 theaters (+9); PTA: $1,895; Cumulative: $52,871

Modest second weekend expansion for this recreation of a celebrity Argentine outlaw.

Ongoing/expanding (grosses over $50,000)

Boy Erased (Focus) – Week 3

$1,280,000 in 409 theaters (+332); Cumulative: $2,634,000

The widening of Joel Edgerton’s well received drama about gay conversion therapy had a response well ahead of similar early breaks this fall. With strong support from Focus, this so far has built strong audience support. That’s not automatic for a controversial social issue film: the strong cast led by Lucas Hedges, Russell Crowe, and Nicole Kidman clearly boosted the cause. Unlike several other struggling films, this looks to be nicely positioned to expand further and benefit from both immediate and later holiday playtime.

Dolly Wells as "Anna" and Melissa McCarthy as "Lee Israel" in the film CAN YOU EVER FORGIVE ME? Photo by Mary Cybulski. © 2018 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation All Rights Reserved

“Can You Ever Forgive Me?”

Photo by Mary Cybulski

Can You Ever Forgive Me? (Fox Searchlight)- Week 5

$880,000 in 555 theaters (+164); Cumulative: $5,058,000

Melissa McCarthy’s foray into specialized continues to show steady interest at what looks like its widest point. but the dramedy is falling short of Searchlight’s “The Old Man and His Gun” at roughly the same point of its decent run. For the older core specialized moviegoers, a big star like McCarthy seems to have less pull than Robert Redford despite her strong acclaim for this role.

The Hate U Give (20th Century Fox) – Week 7

$815,000 in 595 theaters (-517); Cumulative: $28,258,000

Still adding to its impressive total deep into its run, George Tillman Jr.’s timely drama about a high school girl’s actions after a police killing is still finding interest. This will end up in the low $30 million range and leads the totals for all initially limited releases this year.

A Private War (Aviron) – Week 3

$725,000 in 865 theaters (+827); Cumulative: $1,092,000

Aviron succeeded in getting a strong group of theaters in a crowded period for their Rosamund Pike vehicle about an acclaimed war correspondent. That’s where their success ends, with a per theater average under $1,000 putting it in precarious shape going into the holiday weekend.

TimothŽe Chalamet as Nic Sheff and Steve Carell as David Scheff star in BEAUTIFUL BOY

“Beautiful Boy”

Francois Duhamel

Beautiful Boy (Amazon) – Week 6

$587,016 in 558 theaters (-218); Cumulative: $6,406,000

This should be the last wide week for the Steve Carell/Timothee Chalamet drug addiction story, with Amazon having drawn significant attention and a strong gross to aid its awards hopes.

Free Solo (Greenwich) – Week 8

$491,825 in 187 theaters (-79); Cumulative: $8,960,000

National Geographic’s acclaimed documentary is still strong as it continues its climb to at least $10 million, with some level beyond that increasingly likely.

The Old Man and the Gun (20th Century Fox) – Week 8

$160,000 in 171 theaters (-224); Cumulative: $10,611,000

The last stages of Robert Redford’s bank robber portrayal continue to maximize what has been a well-played release by Fox Searchlight.

Mid 90s (A24) – Week 5

$125,000 in 84 theaters (-256); Cumulative: $7,159,000

Jonah Hill’s debut feature set in the world of 1990s teen skateboarders is wrapping up its run at a level that suggests he has reason to pursue a parallel career in directing.

Suspiria (Amazon) – Week 4

$93,950 in 53 theaters (-208); Cumulative: $2,234,000

The initial strong interest and then quick national release has left Luca Guadagnino’s take on the Argento classic mostly played out already in its fourth week.

MARIA CALLAS WITH PHOTOGRAPHERSVARIOUS - 1968

“Maria by Callas”

REX/Shutterstock

Maria By Callas (Sony Classics) – Week 3

$110,507 in 29 theaters (+3); Cumulative: $484,009

Response remains steady (and positive) in the still limited dates for this documentary about the legendary diva with new material from her private archives.

Suspiria (Amazon) – Week 4

$93,950 in 53 theaters (-208); Cumulative: $2,234,000

The initial strong interest and then quick national release has left Luca Guadagnino’s take on the Argento classic mostly played out by its fourth week.

Burning (Well Go) – Week 4

$65,000 in 25 theaters (-2); Cumulative: $300,954

This South Korean film, which continues to get reviews close to the best of any 2018 film, is doing better than average business for a specialized foreign-language feature.

Wildlife (IFC) – Week 5

$65,612 in 98 theaters (-7); Cumulative: $728,585

This Jake Gyllenhaal/Carey Mulligan family drama continues to struggle to find an audience, pulling under $1,000 per theater this weekend.

Border (Neon) – Week 4

$55,001 in 30 theaters (+14); Cumulative: $337,261

Sweden’s entry for Foreign Language Film expanded with minor impact similar to most recent subtitled releases.

Colette (Bleecker Street) – Week 9

$51,522 in 86 theaters (+5); Cumulative: $5,089,000

In its final stages, Keira Knightley’s portrayal of the French novelist has passed $5 million: it’s one of the strongest early fall releases.

Also noted:

Tea With the Dames (IFC) – $18,721 in 24 theaters; Cumulative: $728,585

The Wife (Sony Pictures Classics) – $18,103 in 25 theaters; Cumulative: $7,773,000

What They Had (Bleecker Street) – $10,326 in 24 theaters; Cumulative: $254,061

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Source: IndieWire film