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February 12, 2019

Delightful Pet Portraitures that will brighten your day

Delightful Pet Portraitures that will brighten your dayAoiroStudioFeb 12, 2019

Elke Vogelsang also know as Wieselblitz is a photographer from Germany. She discovered her passion for photography when living a downside in her life, she quickly turned it around into a passionate and became an editorial and commercial photographer. She specialized in pet portraiture, how cool is that? As you can see below, it’s hard not to go “awww” just by looking at this stunning collection. Capturing their emotions through such grace and let’s meet her star companions: Noodles, Scout and Ioli. Hope you will enjoy!

Links

Photography

Delightful Pet Portraitures that will brighten your dayDelightful Pet Portraitures that will brighten your dayDelightful Pet Portraitures that will brighten your dayDelightful Pet Portraitures that will brighten your dayDelightful Pet Portraitures that will brighten your dayDelightful Pet Portraitures that will brighten your dayDelightful Pet Portraitures that will brighten your dayDelightful Pet Portraitures that will brighten your dayDelightful Pet Portraitures that will brighten your dayDelightful Pet Portraitures that will brighten your dayDelightful Pet Portraitures that will brighten your dayDelightful Pet Portraitures that will brighten your dayDelightful Pet Portraitures that will brighten your day

Source: Abduzeedo Photography

February 11, 2019

Interaction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game Prototype

Interaction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game PrototypeAoiroStudioFeb 11, 2019

This is a game prototype that I would love to share on ABDZ, it’s a prototype (soon-to-be-released) designed by Sylvain Theyssens, Anthony Meric and Oleg Pashkovsky. First, the game is all about timing as I quote: “You are given only ninety nine seconds to succeed. The more you play, the fastest you become, and further you can go”. Interesting concept right? Now let’s take a closer look at the interactions, they are quite subtle especially on the UI but it gets quite creative with the game itself. It will be interesting to give it a try when it will become available.

Links

Interaction Design

Interaction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game PrototypeInteraction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game PrototypeInteraction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game PrototypeInteraction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game PrototypeInteraction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game PrototypeInteraction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game PrototypeInteraction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game PrototypeInteraction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game PrototypeInteraction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game PrototypeInteraction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game PrototypeInteraction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game Prototype

Credits

Source: Abduzeedo UI/UX

February 11, 2019

Beautiful Liquify Logo Animation in After Effects

Beautiful Liquify Logo Animation in After EffectsabduzeedoFeb 11, 2019

I have been going back through old tutorials to fix some of the images that might be broken or with old formatting. The blog has changed quite a lot since we started 12 years ago. It’s incredible to see how many Photoshop tutorials we’ve written and how some of them stood the test of time. One of them was the Beautiful Water Effect in Photoshop. I love that tutorial, and it gave me the motivation that I need to continue studying After Effects. My goal was to try to reproduce the effect with some cool motion to it. With that, I would love to share a little After Effects tutorial on how I achieved the result.

A little disclaimer, I am not a pro with After Effects, on the contrary, I am learning, and my goal is to share the step by step on the things I discover along the way. I am sure there are more natural ways or better ways from other great resources, this one here is just a bit of my way of learning.

After Effects Tutorial

Step 1

The first thing to do is to try to understand how much in common After Effects and Photoshop have. In Photoshop this effect is quite simple, you use a displacement map. For my surprise, After Effects also have one.

So let’s get this started. Create a new project and add a new composition. Composition>New Composition.

Step 2

For my Photoshop image, I used a photo of ocean waves. So now we need to find a video for this project. It’s amazing how similar things feel when I started doing Photoshop tutorials. It was tough to find high-quality resources; we didn’t have Unsplash back in the day.

Now for photography, we have a plethora of excellent places. For video, the story is a bit different. I started this project using a sample for Adobe Stock, however, after searching I found a right place, it’s called Pexel Videos. The clip I am using is from there; it’s titled Close-Up Video Of Water Ripples by Stas Knop.

 

Step 3

Download the video and drag it to your Project panel. In Project pane, select the clip and hit “Enter,” to rename it. I like to keep the names short. I just called mine “Ocean.”

After that, drag the “Ocean” clip to your composition timeline panel. That way it gets centralized automatically.

Step 4

Let’s change opacity to 90%. In the timeline, expand the Ocean object, the expand Transform, and you will see Opacity. Just turn it to 90%

Step 5

Now let’s adjust the colors. Go to Effect>Color Correction>Hue/Saturation. Reduce the Saturation to -100.

Step 6

Let’s tweak the Levels now to remove the greyish look. Go to Effect>Color Correction>Levels. Use the values below.

Step 7

Let’s import the artwork we want to use for the displace effect. I am using the Abduzeedo logo. My logo is in vector format in Illustrator. Importing it to After Effects is straightforward. Again, I don’t know if it’s the right way, but this is how I did.

  1. Select the vector in Illustrator and copy it.
  2. In After Effects add a new solid layer. For the name use Logo and make sure the color of the layer is white.
  3. Paste the logo in the composition as a path mask, and that’s it.
  4. Select the layer in the timeline and go to Layer>Pre-Compose. The reason for this is if you want to replace the paths later you can do it without worrying about the timeline, imagine Smart Objects in Photoshop.

Step 8

Time to add some magic, at least it feels like that for me. One thing that I love about After Effects is that it does have some neat tricks, for example, the Effect & Presets panel has a search box. So you can type Displacement and boom, you will find what you need. In our case the Displacement Map. It can also be found via Effect>Distort>Displacement Map.

Make sure the Logo layer is select and just double-click on the Displacement Map option. You will notice on the left side there’s a new panel called Effect Controls. Let’s tweak these numbers to apply the effect to our layer.

  1. For the Displacement Map Layer select the Ocean layer.
  2. Tweak the Max Horizontal and Vertical Displacement. Depending on the logo and how much distortion you want. The cool thing is that you can animate these values too. I will show you an example at the end.

Step 9

To make it more realistic, duplicate the Ocean layer and reorder, so it’s on top of the Logo layer. After that change the Blend Mode to Multiply. After that change the opacity to 70%.

Step 10

The effect is pretty much done, but you can also try to add a little radial gradient to focus everything on the center of the composition. I haven’t found an easy way to add one, but here’s my hacky way.

  1. Create a new composition. Make sure the background is black
  2. Add a new solid layer with white color.
  3. With the Ellipse Tool Q add a Circle in the center. It will mask the white layer.
  4. Go to Effect>Blur & Sharpen>Gaussian Blur. Apply a significant value according to the gradient you want.

Step 11

Back to the main composition. Drag the Gradient composition to the timeline, below the logo but above the Ocean layer. Change the Blend Mode to Overlay.

Step 12

That’s it. The necessary effect is done. What you can do now is try to animate the in and out of the composition. You can do that by tweaking some of the values of the displacement, for example:

  1. Select the Logo and go to Effect Controls>Displacement Filter.
  2. Make sure the timeline is in the 0s. And click on the little Clock/Time watch icon next to Max Horizontal Displacement and Max Vertical Displacement.
  3. Move the timeline to 3s and add keyframes. It’s the little diamond icon on the left side
  4. Move to 7s and add more keyframes
  5. Move to the end of the timeline and add two more keyframes. For these, change the values of the displacement to 300.
  6. Move to the beginning and change the displacement values to 300 as well.
  7. Select all keyframes, then with the right-click select Keyframe Assistant and then select Ease Ease.

Step 13

Let’s make the ocean fade in and fade out. To do that is quite simple.

  1. Select the Ocean Layer and go to the 0s of the timeline. Expand the layer and select Transform>Opacity.
  2. Click on the little stopwatch icon to add a keyframe.
  3. Move to the 2s time and click on the “add keyframe” diamond icon.
  4. Move to 8s and add another keyframe.
  5. Move to the end of the timeline and change the opacity to 0%. It will automatically add a keyframe.
  6. Select all keyframes, then with the right-click select Keyframe Assistant and then select Ease Ease.
  7. With the keyframes selected, copy them. Select the Logo layer, go to Opacity and paste them to replicate the keyframes on that layer.

Conclusion

The effect is pretty much done. You can adjust the timing and add more finesse. That for me is the most challenging part, so have fun and let us know if you have any questions.

Download After Effects File

 

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Source: Abduzeedo Tutorials

February 10, 2019

Learn the Fundamentals of Professional Beauty Lighting


These tips will help you be prepared to take on the challenge of beauty and fashion lighting.


If there’s one thing that the fashion industry is known for, it’s beauty. As a cinematographer who wants to work for clients in that arena, you’ll have to know how to create it with the tools you have.



In this video, Aputure’s Ted Sim and DP Valentina Vee go over several styles and techniques you can use to create professional-level beauty lighting, including how to light backgrounds, soften shadows on your subjects’ faces, as well as how to create interesting lighting effects that will help you stand out. Check it out below:





Vee not only shares a ton of great insight on beauty lighting in general but she also demonstrates her approach to three different styles, including

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Source: NoFilmSchool

February 9, 2019

How to Create Nasty Severed Limbs in After Effects


Need to blow off an arm, sever a finger, or decapitate a head for your film? This tutorial will show you how.


Bloody, gory, and disgusting special and visual effects aren’t just fun to include in your films, they’re also fun to create. If your project calls for some recently and viciously removed limbs and appendages, you might want to take a look at this tutorial from Film Riot.



In it, Ryan Connolly walks you through the somewhat complicated and time-consuming process of removing body parts for use in a movie, including special effects techniques like applying wax and fake blood to create a fake wound, as well as visual effects techniques like green screening, tracking movement, and using mattes in Adobe After Effects. Check it out below:





Both processes, creating a fake wound and doing all of the VFX work, is going to require some time, practice, and perhaps even a little bit of experience working in After Effects and Mocha, so this may not be the tutorial for those who are new to either. (Even then, give it a shot. Why not? I would…and have…and failed…miserably…but whatever…it was fun.)

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Source: NoFilmSchool

February 9, 2019

4 Factors of Depth of Field That You Should Know About


This 4-minute primer will take the guesswork out of achieving different depths of field.


The area of an image in which elements are sharply in focus is known as depth of field and it can be used in many ways to make your shots look and feel the way you want them to.



Shallow depths of field are great for interviews and close-ups, allowing your subject to be in focus while the foreground and background blur and swirl with beautiful bokeh, while deep depths of field are useful for landscapes and wide shots, capturing your entire scene with crisp sharpness so your audience can appreciate every detail.



For beginners, choosing their desired look might be simple, but knowing how to adjust their camera settings may not. In this video, Kellan Reck explains the three factors that play a role in achieving different depths of field and we’ll go a bit more in-depth on each one, as well as how you can use depth of field to tell more dynamic visual stories.



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Source: NoFilmSchool

February 8, 2019

Jump-start Your Career with These Five Big Screenwriting Competitions


Screenwriting competitions can provide the jumping-off point for major writing and directing careers.


Maybe you’re like Evan Daugherty, and you just need the help of a competition like Script Pipeline. The competition took his winning script Snow White & the Huntsman to a manager, and the project was later sold to Universal for $3 million.



Sounds pretty good, right? Most know the benefits that screenwriting competitions can provide, but sometimes we writers just need a little bit of a kick in the pants and a reminder that big deadlines are looming. So, screenwriters, here are some major screenplay competitions with deadlines that are coming up quick!




1. Humanitas New Voices


Television writer Cathleen Young created New Voices in 2010 to provide grant money and mentorship to aspiring writers in the categories of half-hour pilot, hour-long pilot, and feature screenplay. Winners receive $7,500 and several months of development mentorship with partnered showrunners.

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Source: NoFilmSchool

February 8, 2019

A Look Behind the Iconic Dolly Crane from ‘Saturday Night Live’


Saturday Night Live honors one of its most famous pieces of equipment with this feature on its iconic SNL dolly crane.


It’s hard to imagine that a piece of stage equipment could be so recognizable. Yet, for fans of Saturday Night Live over the years, there is indeed one piece of camera gear which always seems to fly out of the set when the broadcast shows its typical behind-the-scenes looks (usually as a teaser or before or after a commercial break).



Originally conceived by the original SNL director Dave Wilson, in a surprisingly heartfelt tribute, crew members of Saturday Night Live reminisce about the early days and their multi-decade careers operating the SNL dolly crane and how its served them through the decades.



The crew, which includes a driver, an operator for locking/unlocking and controlling the arm and camera op sitting atop (plus several other helpers from the looks of it), has worked together for years navigating tight spaces for quick transitions performing dolly moves, trucking shots, and high and low angle maneuvers.

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Source: NoFilmSchool

February 8, 2019

The Daily Chord Weekly Recap – Friday, February 8

SXSW 2019 Daily Chord

This week in the Daily Chord, we included stories about the detention of 21 Savage, the problems at PledgeMusic, and other notable music news from stage to boardroom. The Daily Chord updates you on the best and newest writing on the business and culture of music each weekday, check back five times a week. Send us your email and we’ll send you the stories in handy email newsletter form.


Monday, February 4


Tuesday, February 5


Wednesday, February 6


Thursday, February 7


Friday, February 8

The post The Daily Chord Weekly Recap – Friday, February 8 appeared first on SXSW.

Source: SxSW Music

February 8, 2019

Lipault™ E-Commerce Responsive Web Design

Lipault™ E-Commerce Responsive Web DesignAoiroStudioFeb 08, 2019

Lipault™, a French luggage brand based in Paris, France. We are following their recent redesign of their e-commerce front by Werkstatt. More specifically the role of Pierre-Jean Doumenjou as Lead Art Director on the team. At first glance, it’s a lovely design with a tremendous accent on the image portion. They are promoting the products with so much flair, you can tell that Lipault™ is a luxury brand. I wanna send my “Bravo” to the team for also sharing the hi-fidelity mockup of its responsive design, especially seeing the entire page. It’s not always pretty but it’s a great indicator of the thinking behind the user experience.

Redesign of the e-commerce Lipault™. A Parisian luggage and leather goods brand known for its colors.

Links

Web & Responsive Design

Lipault™ E-Commerce Responsive Web DesignLipault™ E-Commerce Responsive Web DesignLipault™ E-Commerce Responsive Web DesignLipault™ E-Commerce Responsive Web DesignLipault™ E-Commerce Responsive Web DesignLipault™ E-Commerce Responsive Web Design

Animated Transitions

Credits

  • Crafted at Werkstatt
  • Creative Director · Pascal Vu
  • Lead Art Director · Pierre-Jean Doumenjou
  • Motion · Nahel moussi Guillaume Mitch
  • Developer · Florent Biffi Allan Raquin

Source: Abduzeedo UI/UX